Coming Soon

when_idleSeptember 1, 2015

When the Devil’s Idle, by Leta Serafim

In the Book of Revelation, written by St. John on the Greek island of Patmos, it was said a pale horse would appear whose rider was death, others would cry out for vengeance, and the stars of heaven would fall to the earth.

Death does indeed come to Patmos when a German tourist is found murdered in the garden of one of the island’s fabled estates. Yiannis Patronas, Chief Officer of the Chios police, is called in to investigate. He summons his top detective, Giorgos Tembelos, and his friend and amateur sleuth, Papa Michalis, to assist him.

What the policemen discover will disturb them long after the conclusion of the case. Only six people were at the house at the time of the murder—the gardener and housekeeper, the victim’s son and his wife and their two children, a boy of seven and a teenage girl of sixteen. All appear to be innocent. But access to the isolated estate is severely restricted. Surrounded by high walls, it has only one entrance: a metal gate that was bolted at the time of the crime. Patronas can only conclude that one of the six is a killer. He continues to probe, uncovering the family’s many secrets. Some are very old, others more recent. All are horrifying.

But which of these secrets led to murder?

Book 2 of the Greek Islands Mystery series, which began with The Devil Takes Half.

beachcombSeptember 15, 2015

we’ll beachcomb for their broken poems: poems, by elena botts

Eighteen-year-old elena botts distinguished herself as a poet of merit while still in high school. Her poems address themes such as human mortality, vulnerability, and perception of time. They are meant to trigger a thoughtful response from people of diverse sensibilities.

flitOctober 1, 2015

FLIT: A Poetry Mashup of Classic Literature, by Dennis Milam Bensie

J.D. Salinger uses the word “flit” twenty times to reference a homosexual male in his classic 1951 novel, Catcher in the Rye.

Not to suggest the celebrated writer was homophobic. But it was in his book that the word entered common parlance.

Poet and author Dennis Milam Bensie tackles the work of Salinger and thirty-nine other famous authors, including Melville, Dickens, Tolstoy, Twain, and Forrester, and mashes them up into his own concoctions. These poems offer intriguing snippets of gay life, from cruising bears (furry men sailing the ocean blue) to Log Cabin Republicans, to youths subjected to sexual conversion therapy. Every poem in Flit: A Poetry Mashup of Classic Literature is built entirely with words from one classic book or play.

look_deathFebruary 1, 2016

To Look on Death No More, by Leta Serafim

In autumn of 1943, a lone allied soldier parachutes into Greece. His stated goal: to build an airstrip for the British. Brendon O’Malley is an Irishman, and he soon discovers that fighting the Nazis is not the same as embracing the British, who have seriously misled him about his mission. Wounded during the drop, he’s set upon and robbed by a seventeen-year-old girl, Danae, and her little brother, Stefanos, who hold him captive for over six weeks, first in a cave and later in the cellar of their home in Kalavryta. A wary friendship develops between the three. Over time O’Malley’s relationship with the girl gradually deepens into love.

Slowly O’Malley earns Danae’s trust, and he stays on with her family in their house in the village. After his wounds heal, he heads up into the mountains to join the Greek soldiers, the antartes, who are suspicious of the British and slow to accept him into their ranks. O’Malley is no ordinary man, and his honesty, strength, and courage impress them and finally win the day. But disaster lies just ahead; and the Nazis, already a palpable presence in their lives, stage a savage attack on Kalavryta. Through it all, the love of this Irishman for his indomitable Greek muse cannot be extinguished.

game_wardenMarch 1, 2016

The Game Warden’s Son, by Steven T. Callan

Retired game warden Steven T. Callan’s love of nature and passion for protecting wildlife took root long before he experienced the adventures described in his memoir, Badges, Bears, and Eagles. In The Game Warden’s Son, he recounts more of his own investigations along with those of his game warden father and their colleagues. Intertwined with a half century of wildlife investigations and adventures is a story of the lifelong relationship between a boy and his father.

The book begins in the 1950s in the canyons and on the beaches of San Diego with incidents that sparked Steven’s youthful imagination. After an idyllic boyhood in the Northern Sacramento Valley farm town of Orland, where he rode on patrol with his father, Steven became a game warden himself in the early ’70s, joining the “desert rats” who patrolled the California counties banking the Colorado River.

With wry humor, Callan tells how he and his fellow officers outwitted the perpetrators—most of them crafty , some of them hilariously foolish—who poached deer, lobsters, and abalone, baited bears and sold their parts, shot wild ducks to supply restaurants, and killed songbirds for epicurean dinner tables. Their cases took them across the Channel Islands, through the back alleys of San Francisco, up the Sacramento Valley, into the Sierras, and along California’s pristine North Coast. While these dedicated wardens saw their share of greed, they also appreciated the many hunters and fishermen who obeyed the laws and respected the earth’s resources.

In the end, it was all about protecting California’s natural resources for future generations, which is what Callan and company did, enjoying themselves every step of the way.

thursdayMay 1, 2016

Thursday, 1:17 PM, by Michael Landweber

Duck is 17. He will never be 18. Tomorrow is his birthday. It will never be tomorrow.

Time stopped at 1:17 p.m. on a beautiful Thursday afternoon in Washington, DC. Duck is the only person moving in a world where all other living beings have been frozen into statues in an endless diorama. Duck was already in limbo, having lost his mother to cancer and his father to mental illness. Now, faced with the unimaginable, he approaches his dilemma with the eye of an anthropologist and the heart of a teenager trying to do the right thing under the strangest of circumstances. Ultimately, he realizes that while he doesn’t understand the boundaries between friendship and love, that uncertain territory may be the key to restarting the world.

fantasy_bachJune 1, 2016

Fantasy on the Theme B-A-C-H, by David W. Paul

The year is 1969, and Thomas Braxton, a gifted organist at a white, middle-class church in a suburban Baltimore neighborhood, hungers for a glorious performing career of recital tours and recording contracts. Then he is given the opportunity of a lifetime: a recital at the National Cathedral in Washington, D.C. He has six months to prepare. The catch: the program includes Franz Liszt’s Fantasy and Fugue on the Theme B-A-C-H, a notoriously difficult piece he has never been able to master. During his first, unsuccessful attempts, a frustrated teacher told him that the price of mastery might be madness. Braxton is fascinated by the 19th century composer, Liszt, famous for his skill at the keyboard and weakness for women.

Thomas’ friendship with a radical inner-city priest, Archie Graham, leads him into a rundown neighborhood of East Baltimore, where he encounters a homeless man and a young black prostitute. They linger in Thomas’ mind, appearing in dreams both erotic and violent. As Thomas immerses himself in Liszt’s life, he improves his organ skills and becomes more attractive to women. But his increasingly bizarre behavior worries his friend Archie. While mourning the lost love of his college years—a volatile woman who liked dangerous men—he is drawn to both his underage organ student and her older, seductive sister. He is determined to resist them both. But like Liszt, he is only human, and must pay a price for this surge in sexual and creative power.