Coming Soon

trouble_paradiseJuly 1, 2015

Trouble in Rooster Paradise, by T.W. Emory

Recuperating from an injury and prompted by an eager young nurse, old-timer Gunnar Nilson looks back at one of his big cases as a private eye in 1950. At that time memories of World War II were still fresh, and Seattle was a cultural backwater. The Ballard neighborhood where he hung out his shingle teemed with working-class folk of Scandinavian descent. Gals with hourglass figures and gimlet eyes enticed men in gray flannel suits with cigarettes dangling from their lips.

The case he recounts involves the murder of one of these beauties. Gunnar’s business card is in her pocket, but she’s no client. She’s just a gal he met at the movies; he gave her a ride home and helped her lose the creep who was tailing her. It’s none of Gunnar’s business who killed her, not until he discovers she dated the godson of a wealthy client, a man who’s willing to pay big bucks for Gunnar to nose around.

Nose around he does, in the perfumed rooms of Fasciné Expressions, a “rooster paradise” that employed the murdered girl and is frequented by the godson. Schooled to be class acts by a former showgirl, these fine-feathered hens know how to inspire a man to spend big on gifts for his lady.

Gunnar believes the victim was killed by one of her customers, but the heady fragrance of perfumed female can make it awfully tough for a guy to think clearly, especially when the killer is also breathing down his neck.

Book one in the Gunnar Nilson mystery series.

big_bitch2August 1, 2015

The Big Bitch, by John Patrick Lang

Private Eye Jackson “Doc” Holiday investigates fraud, a crime he knows intimately. He was once a respected and successful mortgage banker who laundered more than 100 million dollars in dirty money. Although never convicted, he has been blackballed from banking.

After his drinking buddy, a Catholic priest named Jesus Cortez, is shot dead in the driveway of Doc’s Berkeley home, he sets out to find his killer. The case takes him in search of an old confederate in Portland, where he begins to suspect that the murder of Jesus is connected to a money laundering scheme suspiciously similar to Doc’s own. As Doc delves in further, he crosses swords with a scheming matriarch, a bent cop, a femme fatale, and a master criminal. Whoever’s at the bottom of this business has already killed and is facing “The Big Bitch,” or life in prison. And they’re not afraid to kill again.

Book 1 in the Jackson “Doc” Holiday Mystery series.

when_idleSeptember 1, 2015

When the Devil’s Idle, by Leta Serafim

In the Book of Revelations, written by St. John on the Greek island of Patmos, it was said a pale horse would appear whose rider was death, others would cry out for vengeance, and the stars of heaven would fall to the earth.

Death does indeed come to Patmos when a German tourist is found murdered in the garden of one of the island’s fabled estates. Yiannis Patronas, Chief Officer of the Chios police, is called in to investigate. He summons his top detective, Giorgos Tembelos, and his friend and amateur sleuth, Papa Michalis, to assist him.

What the policemen discover will disturb them long after the conclusion of the case. Only six people were at the house at the time of the murder—the gardener and housekeeper, the victim’s son and his wife and their two children, a boy of seven and a teenage girl of sixteen. All appear to be innocent. But access to the isolated estate is severely restricted. Surrounded by high walls, it has only one entrance: a metal gate that was bolted at the time of the crime. Patronas can only conclude that one of the six is a killer. He continues to probe, uncovering the family’s many secrets. Some are very old, others more recent. All are horrifying.

But which of these secrets led to murder?

Book 2 of the Greek Islands Mystery series, which began with The Devil Takes Half.

flitOctober 1, 2015

FLIT: A Poetry Mashup of Classic Literature, by Dennis Milam Bensie

J.D. Salinger uses the word “flit” twenty times to reference a homosexual male in his classic 1951 novel, Catcher in the Rye.

Not to suggest the celebrated writer was homophobic. But it was in his book that the word entered common parlance.

Poet and author Dennis Milam Bensie tackles the work of Salinger and thirty-nine other famous authors, including Melville, Dickens, Tolstoy, Twain, and Forrester, and mashes them up into his own concoctions. These poems offer intriguing snippets of gay life, from cruising bears (furry men sailing the ocean blue) to Log Cabin Republicans, to youths subjected to sexual conversion therapy. Every poem in Flit: A Poetry Mashup of Classic Literature is built entirely with words from one classic book or play.

fantasy_bachFebruary 1, 2016

Fantasy on the Theme B-A-C-H, by David W. Paul

The year is 1969, and Thomas Braxton, a gifted organist at a white, middle-class church in a suburban Baltimore neighborhood, hungers for a glorious performing career of recital tours and recording contracts. Then he is given the opportunity of a lifetime: a recital at the National Cathedral in Washington, D.C. He has six months to prepare. The catch: the program includes Franz Liszt’s Fantasy and Fugue on the Theme B-A-C-H, a notoriously difficult piece he has never been able to master. During his first, unsuccessful attempts, a frustrated teacher told him that the price of mastery might be madness. Braxton is fascinated by the 19th century composer, Liszt, famous for his skill at the keyboard and weakness for women.

Thomas’ friendship with a radical inner-city priest, Archie Graham, leads him into a rundown neighborhood of East Baltimore, where he encounters a homeless man and a young black prostitute. They linger in Thomas’ mind, appearing in dreams both erotic and violent. As Thomas immerses himself in Liszt’s life, he improves his organ skills and becomes more attractive to women. But his increasingly bizarre behavior worries his friend Archie. While mourning the lost love of his college years—a volatile woman who liked dangerous men—he is drawn to both his underage organ student and her older, seductive sister. He is determined to resist them both. But like Liszt, he is only human, and must pay a price for this surge in sexual and creative power.