Coming Soon

stars_flowersDecember 1, 2014

Stars and Flowers: Informative Talks with Celebrities about Plants, by Evelyn Anderson

Through childhood memories of her mother’s flower garden, Evelyn Klahre Anderson gained a love and appreciation for gardening. In the late 1970s, when it became possible for her to join reporters at press conferences, it seemed only natural for her to begin asking the celebrities about plants and flowers. From Marcel Marceau to Ann B. Davis to Rosalynn Carter, she discovered that many famous people also had special connections with plants and flowers.

During her many years as an outdoors columnist for the premier newspapers in Erie, Pennsylvania, the Erie Daily Times and the Weekender, Evelyn was a dedicated journalist who would stop at nothing to get her story. Even if it meant hiding backstage from Marcel Marceau’s personal assistant, who insisted her boss was too tired to be interviewed. Evelyn spoke to political figures, Broadway stars, famous scientists, astronauts, recording artists, network newsmen, environmentalists, comedians, even former presidents and their wives in her quest to learn the impact that plants and flowers had on the lives of these larger than life personalities.

The result, Stars and Flowers, is a delightful treasury of humorous and fascinating anecdotes and homey insights from the gracious stars whose names and faces dominated the media in the 1980s and ’90s.

kalamazooFebruary 1, 2015

Exile on Kalamazoo Street, by Michael Loyd Gray

Bryce Carter was once a novelist with a following. But unlike James Joyce’s Ulysses, which is genius to millions, Bryce’s experimental novel Reflections was genius to maybe three people. After walking away from his teaching job, Bryce was headed on a one-way collision course down Whiskey River, with only one path to survival: sobriety. And for him, giving up drinking meant exiling himself from his former life.

Now Bryce is holed up in his house on Kalamazoo Street along with his cat, Black Kitty, also a refugee from the cold, snowy world outside. The terms of his self-imposed exile make him dependent on his sister and a sitting duck for anyone who cares to drop by, including an officious minister, an old drinking buddy, an alluring former student, and a pair of Hollywood flunkies who offer Bryce a chance to rescue Reflections from obscurity—if only he can write the screenplay. Unfortunately Bryce’s well of creativity has dried up along with his will to drink, and the more time he spends in exile, the less inclined he is to dip a toe into the icy waters of reality.

chef_interruptedMarch 1, 2014

Chef Interrupted: Discovering Life’s Second Course in Ireland with Multiple Sclerosis, by Trevis L. Gleason

When Trevis Gleason, a former chef at the top of his professional culinary career, was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis, he lost everything—his job, his marriage, even his perceived persona. Surveying the ruins of his former life, he saw an opportunity to fulfill a long-postponed dream. He would travel from Seattle, Washington, to the wilds of west Kerry, Ireland for the winter.

Renting a rustic cottage in “The Town,” Trevis braved narrow, sheep-obstructed roads and antiquated heating systems to learn that his life, his loves (including cooking), and even his dreams weren’t lost, just waiting to be rediscovered in this magical place.

He acquired a charming puppy named Sadie, who grounded his days and served as a devoted companion as he surmounted inevitable physical setbacks and cultural challenges. All the while, he entertained a steady stream of visiting friends and relatives, including his former wife. The Town’s colorful characters welcomed the American stranger as one of their own, and he soon found himself reveling in the beauty of the rugged countryside, the authentic joy of the holidays, the conviviality of the pubs, and the hearty flavor of the simple food.

Recipes included.

dashApril 1, 2014

Dash in the Blue Pacific, by Cole Alpaugh

Dash does not feel lucky. When his plane crashes in the South Pacific on a honeymoon flight to Sydney, Australia, he is already a broken man, having left his cheating fiancée at home in Vermont. Dash is the crash’s only survivor, and the natives who find his battered body blame him for poisoning their fish with spilled jet fuel. Once he has sufficiently recovered, they plan to offer him as a human sacrifice to their Volcano God, who they believe downed his plane and cursed them with drought and hardship.

While Dash awaits his fate, he abandons all hope of rescue. But his new life has its moments. He meets ten-year-old Tiki, daughter of the chief and an innocent who dreams of being “chosen” by the soldiers who occasionally visit their island. He also conjures up an imaginary friend, Weeleekonawahulahoopa—Willy, for short. Willy is half-man, half-fish, a sometime god who resigned his lofty status after failing to save his people from drowning.

As Dash comes to understand the natives who hold him captive and confront his own unhappy past, he suspects that he might not be so unlucky after all.

fantasy_bachJuly 1, 2015

Fantasy on the Theme B-A-C-H, by David W. Paul

The year is 1969, and Thomas Braxton, a gifted organist at a white, middle-class church in a suburban Baltimore neighborhood, hungers for a glorious performing career of recital tours and recording contracts. Then he is given the opportunity of a lifetime: a recital at the National Cathedral in Washington, D.C. He has six months to prepare. The catch: the program includes Franz Liszt’s Fantasy and Fugue on the Theme B-A-C-H, a notoriously difficult piece he has never been able to master. During his first, unsuccessful attempts, a frustrated teacher told him that the price of mastery might be madness. Braxton is fascinated by the 19th century composer, Liszt, famous for his skill at the keyboard and weakness for women.

Thomas’ friendship with a radical inner-city priest, Archie Graham, leads him into a rundown neighborhood of East Baltimore, where he encounters a homeless man and a young black prostitute. They linger in Thomas’ mind, appearing in dreams both erotic and violent. As Thomas immerses himself in Liszt’s life, he improves his organ skills and becomes more attractive to women. But his increasingly bizarre behavior worries his friend Archie. While mourning the lost love of his college years—a volatile woman who liked dangerous men—he is drawn to both his underage organ student and her older, seductive sister. He is determined to resist them both. But like Liszt, he is only human, and must pay a price for this surge in sexual and creative power.