The Fun of Speaking English, Dorothea Grossman's Swan Song

The Fun of Speaking English: Selected Poems ($11.95, 120 pages, ISBN: 978-1-60381-149-1) is the definitive collection of American poet Dorothea Grossman. She died on May 6, 2012 at the age of 74.

While we were deeply saddened by Dorothea’s death, we feel fortunate that she had already approved nearly every aspect of the design and content. We completed the process with the generous help of Dottie’s friends, organized by Benjamin Marcus, who designed the front cover. Special thanks to  Benjamin as well as Mark Weber, Russell Astley, Elaine Terranova, Douglas Benezra, Judi Sato, Rob and Cathy Blakeslee, Ann Hyland, and Phyllis Hatfield.

For a touching online tribute to Dottie by her close friend, jazz musician Mark Weber, please click here.

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**Also available on Kindle or other eBook versions on Smashwords**

“An essentially American poet.”

—Russell Astley, teacher, critic and writer

“Funny, wild, and incredibly beautiful. …. How does she do it?”

—Elaine Terranova, poet

“Each poem is a compact expression of whimsy and heartbreak.”

—David DuPont

A native of Philadelphia, PA, Dorothea “Dottie” Grossman lived in Los Angeles for thirty-plus years. Her work was featured in the March, 2010 edition of Poetry Magazine and was awarded that magazine’s J. Howard and Barbara M. J. Wood Prize. The 2007 opera, Five, by flutist/producer Ellen Burr, is based on a selection of her poems. The late Allen Ginsberg called her poetry, “clear, odd, personal, funny or wild-weird, curious and lucid.” Her work has appeared in numerous poetry journals and magazines.

Grossman had two poetry collections, Cuttings and Poems From Cave 17, self published. A third book, Museum of Rain, was published by Take Out Press in Portland, OR. Her two CDs, Call & Response and Call & Response & Friends, represent the poet in live performance mode with improvising musicians.

“I like to think my poems are honest and that they connect me with my fellow mammals in a way that is both aesthetically pleasing and comforting. If they retain an air of mystery/humor, so much the better.”

—Dorothea Grossman

As the World Turns

The Cape Chestnuts

are on their way out;

soon, in the towns

with the Indian names

there will be

Christmas trees

instead of pumpkins,

and the wind

that scooped

the quilted desert

into a harvest bouquet

will invent

something new.

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